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Archive for March, 2008

Will history respect Nadal reaching the No. 1 rank, if he ever gets there?

Posted by tennisplanet on March 31, 2008

Getting there will be purely for bragging rights. Everyone including his own soul knows he will never be considered the real No. 1 ever, unless his wins spill over to other surfaces.

In fact, there should be enough checks in place for anyone to become No. 1 without conquering at least 70 percent of the tennis world.

No matter how astounding his clay court exploits are, they do not warrant the top spot in the world.

What’s next then? Grass court specialist vanquishes everyone at two month grass court season and becomes No. 1?

However, it may be an acknowledgement of his utter domination on clay, specially in this era with Federer and Djokovic in operation. Otherwise he could have been there already, confirming lack of real talent on other surfaces.

Although he cannot be blamed for it if it eventually happens, since he is still playing by the book, it gives fans a skewed view of the whole season.

Can you imagine an NBA team winning the championship with a losing record on the road? Or Ali being declared the heavyweight champion of the world, based on his wins in the US only.

To be No. 1 anywhere, at anything, ideally you should be able to master most if not all that your operation covers.

It’s a pity that a talent like Nadal is unable to master other surfaces to justify being one of the truly greats of the game. It can be done, as was proven convincingly by Borg – five times.

But I feel this year, there have been some encouraging signs that some concerted effort has been made to adjust his game. But it could be too little too late if Djokovic gets his full stride and other youngster begin to bloom.

If it can ever happen, it is difficult to imagine it happening any other year than this one right here, right now.

Besides, just getting there is a small part of the journey, staying there is what takes the real man. Just ask Sharapova or Roddick.

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Have you heard the news lately?

Posted by tennisplanet on March 31, 2008

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Lions vs Elephants. What size balls do you need to even go after that huge a target?

Posted by tennisplanet on March 31, 2008

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Make a list of events that bring an instant smile to your freaking face.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 31, 2008

 

I know you don’t have too many of those in your miserable lives, but think deep and hard and put then down on paper.

Now do I even have to freaking tell you what to do next? Geeeeeeeeeeeeeezzzzzzzzzzzz!!!!!!

Whenever you have a negative and depressing thought, bring up one of those events in your mind and instantly feel good.

I carry it in my, well, all over the basement. If you have missed it, clothes are not my favorite thing. When required, all I have to do is pull the list out for instant ‘relief’.

Try it. What have you got to lose? You can’t get any more miserable than you are now.

WRITE THEM FREAKING DOWN. GEEEEEEEEEEEZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!!!!!!!

Stop freaking rolling your eyes and yes I heard that!!!!!!!!!

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Nadal businesslike in his straight set win over Kiefer.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 30, 2008

Rafael Nadal, of Spain, prepares to serve to Nicolas Kiefer during the third-round match at the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla., Sunday, March 30, 2008.  
 

Nadal doesn’t have a title yet and he has not even faced Federer. Federer has no title and he has not faced Nadal yet. The big winners so far this season?

Djokovic (AO), Roddick (Dubai) and Djokovic(Indian Wells).

At two of these three important events (Dubai and Indian Wells), Nadal lost to the eventual winner (Roddick and Djokovic) and Tsonga at the AO was not too far from that slot.

To him that means Federer may not be his most feared rival anymore on hard courts. It could also mean that field might have overtaken him on that surface for good. Although he is still able to hold his own against most everybody else, but the title contenders for any given event have so far taken him out in humiliating straight sets – at all the above three tournaments.

Rafael Nadal of Spain returns a shot against Nicolas Kiefer of Germany during day seven of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 30, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images) 

Draws he has received so far have also contributed to Nadal getting deep at tournaments, as is the case here. He is not going to clash with a title contender until the finals, whether it’s Federer or Tsonga or Roddick. That’s the hump that appears to have gained height on him to the extent he is unable to find the next gear to scale that mountain. Straight set losses at that level can point to no other direction.

For the past two years, Nadal has been unable to string together any impressive wins in the second half of the season after he is done with clay. He has to extend himself so far out on clay, to just hold his current ranking that he ends up being either completely spent or injured when he comes out the other end.

He has won just five freaking hard court titles in his entire career since 2004. That works out to just one title per year.

Rafael Nadal of Spain look on against  Nicolas Kiefer of Germany during day seven of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 30, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images) 

Nevertheless, Nadal has shown consistency at all the events he has played so far except Rotterdam where he inexplicably lost in the second round. Other than that misstep he has reached one quarterfinal, two semifinals and one final. That’s not bad, but the kind of year Nadal is in this season, this is not even enough to hold his current ranking forget about gaining on Federer.

However, it’s encouraging to see some improvements in his hard court game this year. His first serve percentage is over 70 percent and his ace count is slowly appear to be moving up. Will that be enough to keep the wolves at bay?

Answer coming up right after the clay season ends for sure.

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Is Miami the place for a hot upstart to get through?

Posted by tennisplanet on March 30, 2008

 

With two failed attempts at the AO and Indian Wells, this could be a perfect opportunity for a hot joker to finally come through.

If you were still in coma, Tsonga went on this incredible run at the AO defeating Murray, Gasquet, Youzhny and Nadal before falling to Djokovic in the finals. Then at Indian Wells, Fish started his own tour frying Davydenko, Hewitt, Nalbandian and Federer before Djokovic again put a halt to that run.

While no one has really made a breakthrough wild run yet, but the likelihood of it happening has increased sharply due to the freaking seeds failing to sprout at Miami. With Djokovic, the only one who has stopped the two freaks already out, Federer still to find his stride and Nadal not on his most comfortable surface, the gate is wide open for some black sheep to dart in.

Can Tsonga repeat again or is Ancic ready for prime time in need to prove himself again after the long absence from the tour? Youzhny? Can’t think of anyone else who has shown any kahunas yet. 

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Carrot suddenly appears closer than it has ever been for Nadal with Djokovic’s exit and the seed tumble.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 30, 2008

 

It appears almost impossible that Federer will falter on his way to the final here, not with the clowns lined up now. Translation: Federer will gain on Nadal in the points race for the top spot.

But Nadal has just Kiefer and Mathieu to beat to not lose any points here. With Blake and possibly Berdych next before he meets Federer in the finals, there’s a good chance that Nadal can soften the impact of Federer gaining points here, by earning some of his own by potentially winning the title here.

Rafael Nadal, of Spain, celebrates after scoring a point against Benjamin Becker during a second-round match at the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla., Friday, March 28, 2008. Nadal won 7-5, 6-2.  

And with clay season starting right after this event, Nadal could be home free. With whatever has happened so far this season, it’s reasonable for Nadal’s camp to assume that Nadal can clinch the top spot, if not narrow it down to a very manageable margin by the time the red season comes to an end.

With Djokovic falling back in the points race, Nadal can play more freely instead of looking over his shoulder for Djokovic all the time. As clay is physically more demanding, it is safe to predict that Federer’s movement will become more of an issue on the red surface.

All this is firing up Nadal like a kid in a toy store, or is it a bull in a china store? This again proves how much an individual is able to produce due to a certain event which has nothing to do with his physical game but rather what’s between the OK ears.

Swedish tennis great Bjorn Borg has tipped Spain's Rafael Nadal, seen here on March 19 to replace Switzerland's Roger Federer as the world number one player. 

Did you watch Kobe Bryant score 53 points yesterday? It was just his second 50 plus game for this month. BTW, he was also thrown out of the game by the referee the day before that. Can you freaking put two and two together here, or do I have to spoon feed everything here?

The freaking point is this: We all have so much in reserve that never gets tapped into unless a life changing event presents itself to stimulate our brain to the extent that we are able to produce magic physically. If you have never experienced it ever, please consider yourself dead.

Federer knows he has been able to narrowly avert the take over at the AO, but his job is far from over. Unless he is able to shift gears in a hurry, his car is going down before June and the grass court season starts.

Nadal may need just reaching the tape and pinnacle once to generate so much momentum and do or die attitude that a crow bar will be required to wrest that No. 1 rank from him again. It could also lead to a drastic improvement in his hard court game out of sheer necessity to maintain his perch at the top. Would that create some excitement? You think!!!!!!!!

What exciting times. Anytime I have to post ‘post it’ notes to remind myself to ‘entertain’ goats during the day, you bet there’s more something fascinating going on elsewhere.

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Louise wants to challenge all you freaks to come out of your hole and protective freaking shield. Prize: Front row, middle of the court seats at Wimbledon.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 30, 2008

 

Louise |

right i was thinking.. if we have a bet or a competion or make prediction on who you think will make it to the finals or win. TP keeps the table on who has guessed right, i guess we will have to think who will win rather than who we want to win. thought it would add a little spice to the site D
then who wins over all gets a…? maybe someone could think something up for that? what you think?

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The only seeds alive so far.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 30, 2008

1. Federer: 1

2. Nadal: 2.

3. Davydenko: 4.

4. Roddick: 6.

5. Blake: 9.

6. Berdych: 10.

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This Indian Wells-Miami and Montreal-Cincinnati back to back shock is not easy to absorb.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 30, 2008

That’s the Masters Series duet. Roland Garros-Wimbledon is the Grand Slam’s almost impossible couple.

Both Djokovic and Ivanovic are finding that out the hard way. Djokovic went out in the opening round at Cincinnati after winning Montreal, just like he did here after winning Indian Wells. Ivanovic is almost out to Davenport.

It requires special focus and experience to pull these back to back puppies out together. It starts with realizing the test ahead even before you play the opening match at the first one, and then adjusting your schedule and strategy on and off the court to assure a trophy at both events.

Isn’t Borg the only one to have pulled that rabbit out of a hat, what five times at the Grand Slam level? Both Roland Garros and Wimbledon in the same year.

Well, both Federer and Nadal have come pretty close to it last two years. Besides, the fact that Federer has won both Indian Wells-Miami and Montreal-Cincinnati combo is a testament to his game and work ethic.

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Did you hear about Young throwing his racket out of the freaking stadium?

Posted by tennisplanet on March 30, 2008

 

Yeah, at Delray Beach, Florida, in his match against Amer, Donald Young got so frustrated that he threw his racket out of the freaking stadium. Not the main one but you know the side courts.

So now as a fan you need a hard hat to be walking around the courts? Why don’t we just go for the full body armour, with the way things have been going at tennis venues lately? It would be a good idea to remain in that attire while in the stands as well.

We will let you know when it will be required at least a day after you have returned home after cheering for a player in the stands. You see it’s no longer safe to be cheering for your favorite player for fear of offending the other players’ fans. You don’t want them following you home, do you?

How soon now before the courts get flooded with rowdy fans after or during the match like in soccer? Or do we have to wait for the beer bottles and chairs first?

With even players providing a lead now, how far can the fans be?

BTW, Young was fined $5000. He went home with $1000 from the tournament as he had ‘earned’ $6000 in all there.

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When will the last barrier go away? I meant women earning more than men. WHAT? What were YOU thinking, you perverts?

Posted by tennisplanet on March 30, 2008

Sara Errani of Italy returns a shot against Justine Henin of Belgium during day seven of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 30, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images) 

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Federer wins his opening round match. Has it come down to this that this makes news now?

Posted by tennisplanet on March 30, 2008

Roger Federer of Switzerland celebrates after defeating Gael Monfils of France during day six of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 29, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)  

The only stat that seems uncharacteristic in the entire match was the ace count from Federer: 2 to 8 from Monfils. Monfils had eight against Isner too.

So not only was Federer not able to get his serve past Monfils, his movement and anticipation has to be way off to be on equal footing with a snail like Isner, to let Monfils fire eight past him.

Roger Federer of Switzerland looks on against Gael Monfils of France during day six of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 29, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images) 

But I think it was a good enough workout for Federer, considering all potential candidates in his line up expected to provide real match play are already freaking out – Wawrinka (somehow something’s fishy here), Hewitt and Robredo. They have been replaced by Soderling, Acasuso (change the freaking name, for crying out loud) and Sela.

Not to mention he will most likely face a Davydenko instead of a Murray in the semis.

Roger Federer, of Switzerland, prepares to serve during a second-round match against Gael Monfils, of France, at the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla., Saturday, March 29, 2008.  

With Tsonga looming after Federer is done with the first three tomato cans, it’s going to be a shock, jumping in a pool with cold water from the comfort of an air-conditioned suite.

It is similar to the Haas withdrawal at Indian Wells. Only difference is this time there is at least a body, so that should be a step up or is it? Federer should make sure he pays for all their meals in his room to make sure they don’t fall sick before the match.

Federer desperately needs a close match against a quality opponent to get his confidence back. These Monfil matches are doing nothing for it.

So on paper, it’s not looking too good for Federer. The only chance of him facing real competition is only in the finals, if Nadal keeps his end of the deal. With current run up to the finals for Federer, Nadal clearly will have an edge, with the backdrop of recent developments this season, even though it’s a hard court.

Other than his potential clash with Blake, Nadal should be able to get through without much trouble. But if Blake’s match extends him, the likelihood of which is extremely high, it could level the playing field for Federer in the finals.

A title here for Federer is high and minuscule at the same time. It’s huge for obvious reasons. It’s small for obvious reasons. OK, I was lazy. What do you expect, after being day in and day out with you cheap, lazy freaking freaks?

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Low-Tech answers to high-tech problems.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 30, 2008

Wet phone?

Sleep through the alarm clock?

DVDs with scratches?

Click here for more.

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It appears there’s just one sure way to win at Miami: Don’t die before April 6th.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 29, 2008

At the rate, the seeds are falling or getting extended to gruelling three sets and tie-breaks, in their opening freaking round, it’s not a stretch to predict most will not be even alive to see this tournament end.

So just don’t make any sudden movements till that fateful Sunday and if you are found breathing in your hotel room by then, we will come and hand over the freaking check and the trophy.

Can you pull that off, or do we have to downgrade it to clinically alive?

Geeeeeeeeeeeeezzzzzzzzzzzz!!!!!!!!!!!!

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And these are the crappy clothes you chose for the party? No wonder you are dying to get back on the tour!!!

Posted by tennisplanet on March 29, 2008

Professional tennis player Gustavo Kuerten poses on the red carpet at the ATP Sony Ericsson party at Epic night club March 28, 2008 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Doug Murray/Getty Images) 

All you need is a bowl in the hand and you could be on your way to a 99 cents store for a whole new outfit – for the next year’s party.

If this is what you chose standing in front of your wardrobe, you need therapy, counseling and surgery. And that unshaven look is supposed to make you look rugged not a retarded undernourished lunatic. Get a freaking life!!!!!!!!!!!

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Some seed tumble in pitchkers.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 29, 2008

Lleyton Hewitt of Australia looks on against Jose Acasuso of Argentina during day six of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 29, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

Fernando Verdasco, of Spain, returns to Janko Tipsarevic during the second-round match at the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla., Saturday, March 29, 2008. Tipsarevic won 6-4, 7-6 (4).  

Lleyton Hewitt of Australia looks on against Jose Acasuso of Argentina during day six of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 29, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images) 

Juan Ignacio Chela of Argentina serves against Ivo Minar of the Czech Republic during day six of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 29, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images) 

David Nalbandian, of Argentina, returns a shot during a second-round match against Xavier Malisse, of Belgium, at the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla. Friday, March 28, 2008.

Novak Djokovic of Serbia returns a shot against Kevin Anderson of South Africa during day five of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center in Florida. South African qualifier Kevin Anderson sent defending champion Djokovic packing on Friday, ending the third-seeded Serbian's bid for a second straight ATP Masters Series title, 7-6 (7/1), 3-6, 6-4. 

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Their features don’t match. She is adopted.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 29, 2008

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Roddick barely wins his opening round match against a qualifier.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 29, 2008

Andy Roddick, of the United States, celebrates after his 5-7, 6-2, 6-4 win over Viktor Troicki, of Serbia, during a second-round match at the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla., Saturday, March 29, 2008.  
 

If this is what qualifiers are doing so far here, Federer has a battle on his hands.

Here’s the havoc these low life qualifiers are responsible for:

-Minar has defeated Rochus and Chela No. 30 seed.

-Sweeting beat Volandri and is facing Monaco now.

-Reynolds beat Safin, but lost to Youzhny.

-Warburg defeated Starace.

-Cuevas beat Spadea.

-Anderson beat Calleri and Djokovic.

Andy Roddick returns looks on against Viktor Troicki of Serbia during day six of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 29, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images) 

Roddick cannot afford to turn out these kind of performances at home and on his surface, if he wants any chance of adding to his two titles this season. At the same time, considering who all are already out of the tournament, he may just win this one if he has his pulse on April 6. Breathing will help too.

However, with Tsonga looming at one after next, this may not have been too bad for Roddick to get some good workout and feel the court and the conditions a little bit. It may prove to be a blessing for him depending on how he shapes up as he moves on.

Although he has Federer in the quarterfinals, he may be looking forward to that match like he has never been. He wants to desperately improve that 1-15 record and the 11 straight loses including two apiece at Wimbledon and the US Open.

This could be his first opportunity to win a title while beating Federer en-route. Conditions are ripe for it. How sweet will that be for him.

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Seeds falling like ball pins. And this is just the second day of them playing. Geeezzzz.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 29, 2008

-Djokovic: 3.

-Ferrer: 5.

-Nalbandian: 7.

-Gasquet: 8.

-Murray: 13.

-Robredo: 14.

-Gonzalez: 17.

-Karlovic: 19.

-Moya: 20.

-Hewitt: 21.

-Ferrero: 22.

-Ljubicic: 23.

-Nieminen: 25.

-Kohlschrieber: 26.

-Wawrinka: 28

-Verdasco: 29.

-Chela: 30.

-Lopez: 32.

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Why are tennis umpires treated so poorly compared to other sports?

Posted by tennisplanet on March 29, 2008

 

They have no teeth. If there’s nothing at stake, why should anyone fear anyone?

Roddick’s comments like ‘Kids stay in school, you don’t want to end up as a chair umpire’ or Djokovic’s pumping his fist and thumping his chest in the direction of the umpire after winning the point right after the time warning and others are testament to what players really think about umpires deep down.

Try this behavior against an NBA, NFL or a baseball referee, and not only will you be thrown out of the game and suspended, but your wallet will feel the consequences too.

Although we have come a long way from the McEnroe’s abuse days, it is way short when it comes to other major sports.

Part of the responsibility rests on the chair umpire himself for not enforcing the laws strictly. Umpires have their favorites on the court like the fans and their decisions are likely to be tainted.

It’s ATP’s responsibility to remove the ambiguity by setting clear boundaries and procedures in place, which leaves out all guesswork.

For instance, the time it takes for a player to serve after the point is over maybe put on a clock, like NBA has its shot clock. You hear the sound you get the warning, you hear it again, you lose the point, the match, the money………

Such procedures will eliminate players holding the ref responsible, like it has done in a big way regarding the line calls after the Hawk-Eye introduction.

Get with the times, and make it respectful for all devoting their time to the sport to make it an enjoyable experience for all.

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Is Federer facing dearth of non-tomato can match play again here?

Posted by tennisplanet on March 29, 2008

World number ones Roger Federer, pictured on March 22, and Justine Henin could have a tricky time at the WTA and ATP Masters Series event that begins here on Wednesday thanks to their draws.  

Isner has been removed from the opening round, Robredo, the highest seed before the quarterfinal, is out, Hewitt is already down one set and seems on his way out too. Result: Not enough inclement weather to acclimatize to the sudden shock awaiting in the quarterfinals and beyond.

The road from quarterfinals and beyond is potentially paved with sharks like Tsonga, Murray and Nadal. Although this is a typical progression of an ATP draw for you to move through the tomato cans to the real contenders, the quality of players Federer is likely to face compared to both Murray and Nadal, the top contenders to the title now, is a lot weaker.

Rafael Nadal, of Spain, shakes his head after his 7-5, 6-2  win against Benjamin Becker during the second-round match at the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla., Friday, March 28, 2008.  

Add to it the lack of any match play Federer has had this season AND the three uncharacteristic losses this season, and suddenly it doesn’t look to be the perfect situation for Federer. It’s catch 22 or as close you can get to it. Federer needs match play AND some come from behind matches to gain confidence. Winning with bagels against lesser players, while moving him forward, doesn’t let him achieve anything tangible and real that he can carry over to the tougher battlefield.

Ideal situation? Monfils, followed by Wawrinka and Hewitt, before taking on the big dogs.

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Who are these two clowns? Hint: Their names start with N and A.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 29, 2008

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ATP Ranking and Race Frequently Asked Questions. From Dee. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 29, 2008

Dee |

http://www.atptennis.com/en/players/information/rankfaq.asp#
This would give you some idea, Clay buster.

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Djokovic probably got what he was asking for – kick on his fanny from an unknown.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 28, 2008

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after losing a point to Kevin Anderson during the second round match at the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla., Friday, March 28, 2008. Anderson won, 7-6 (1), 3-6, 6-4.  

Clearly these recent worldwide press musings of him being the world best tennis player this season did have something to say in this loss.

He took his foot off the pedal assuming it will be all cruising from now specially against tomato cans like Anderson. He may have been right about it, but the time warning and fans cheering every one of his missteps combined to throw him off completely.

It seems getting fans’ adulation, adoration and acceptance for Djokovic is close to being No. 1 in the world, if not more. When you are coming from an obscure and a non traditional tennis nation that has been in the news for all the wrong reasons, not having the backing of the fans that are not holding the Serbia flag, becomes vital for many reasons.

Novak Djokovic Serbia returns a shot against Kevin Anderson of South Africa during day five of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 28, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images) 

Following right after some guy called Federer further exacerbates the situation.

It clearly registered with him when the crowd was behind Tsonga at the AO to the extent that he had to bring it up at the trophy ceremony even though it was so lopsided and obvious. He still wanted to salvage the situation by ‘I still love you’ statements.

It proves once again how many of your faculties have be in alignment for you to win a tennis match on the tour, leave alone titles. Djokovic is currently still graduating from the University of hard knocks, but with time still a big ally for him, he can afford these dips for a little longer.

After all both Sampras and Federer, two giants of the game got into their stride close to their 22nd birthday. They were not even close to where Djokovic is now at twenty. So Djokovic has a head start, but that grace period passes fast into a gruelling and fierce test of survival soon.

He appears to be learning from his past mistakes. The US Open final meltdown was not repeated at the AO. He will have to learn to get used to the disappointment of not having the crowd behind him for a while. If he places undue emphasis on that for whatever reason, it will creep into his mental make up to erode focus and concentration. Based on his past track record, he should be able to realize this inevitable fact and learn to live with it instead of fighting it.

But this is a huge break for Nadal. He was the one staring at the barrel of the gun, more than Federer. He can extend the breathing room now by going deeper in the draw here, while reducing the need to duplicate the incredible run he had on clay last year.

The very next scheduled ATP event is at Estoril on clay. Djokovic won that title there too last year like he did at Miami. However it starts on April 14. That’s almost twenty days away from Djokovic first match. It could work for Djokovic considering he will have that extra time to prepare for the crucial clay season.

If Djokovic can adjust and work hard on his clay game during this time, the clay season could turn out to be the turning point for many people at many levels.

Either way, it’s fascinating to experience such excitement so early in the season. It’s going to be sea-saw season with huge peaks and valleys. Who will remain standing in November will truly deserve the cake this season.

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Federer fully recovered from loss to Fish. From Rock. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 28, 2008

Roger Federer, of Switzerland, practices on center court in preparation for the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla. Tuesday, March 25, 2008. The tournament begins Wednesday with Federer's first match on Saturday night.  
 

Rock

Federer fully recovered from loss to Fish

By Sandra Harwitt

MIAMI, Fla., March 27 (Reuters) – World number one Roger Federer said on Thursday he had fully recovered from his semi-final loss to Mardy Fish at last week’s Pacific Life Open.

“You move on, you analyse it, then you look forward. I feel fine now. I’m motivated and I’m confident on the practice courts,” Federer told reporters at the Sony Ericsson Open.

The 26-year-old Swiss, who has won 12 grand slam titles, has made a slow start to his 2008 campaign due to a bout of glandular fever.

He has played in only three tournaments and is still looking for his first title of the year in Miami.

Federer reached the semi-finals at the Australian Open where he lost to eventual champion Novak Djokovic and lost in the first round in Dubai to Andy Murray.

“The sickness just before the Australian Open was the biggest problem for me, because that really sort of set me back a little bit,” he said. “But I still played, I thought, very well throughout the event, and I just felt a little slow throughout.”

Federer said he believed that once he got back into the swing of playing matches on a regular basis again his game would flourish as it had in the past.

http://uk.reuters.com/article/tennisNews/idUKB18555620080327?pageNumber=1&virtualBrandChannel=0

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Roger Federer Interview, Miami, March 27. From Sarah. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 28, 2008

Roger Federer talks to the media during day four of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 27, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)  

Sarah |

Roger Federer Interview, Miami, March 27

Posted on March 28, 2008

SONY ERICSSON OPEN

March 27, 2008

Roger Federer

MIAMI, FLORIDA

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How would you assess the first three tournaments of the year for you, and has that left your priorities unchanged? Would you have modified them at all?
ROGER FEDERER: They have been rather tricky, I would think, you know. First one of the year is always tough, because there are no real tournaments beforehand. And especially this year with the sickness, I think it was even more complicated, you know.
So preparation definitely wasn’t at its best. Dubai, again, I had a long break before that, and I had a really difficult draw. After realizing what I really had, you know, expectations were maybe really high, you know.
Then in Indian Wells, maybe I’m lacking matches, obviously, going into the event as well, like in Dubai, and I actually played okay.
So, I would think top 5 in the race, things are not looking too bad, and priorities don’t really change for the rest of the year now.

Q. After this is over, do you think you’ll have some problem going back to Wimbledon?
ROGER FEDERER: No, not really. It was just a matter of getting enough matches in in the last events. I mean, these two tournaments are tricky anyway. I realized that last year. You know, if you play well everything’s great. If you lose you have actually some nice time to practice and relax.
When you tend to lose you want to play again so you can forget. But especially during these two tournaments. The press writes a little bit too much sometimes. For me, it’s just a matter of getting back on the winning road, and it would be good for me to win three matches at Indian Wells. Now it’s back to normal again, which is a good thing.

Q. Tiger was in town last week, and your friendship with Tiger has been much talked about. Did you have a chance to talk to him about the ending of his winning streak, and how did he take it?
ROGER FEDERER: I don’t know. I missed him, unfortunately, you know. But he’s on a great run, and hope he’s doing well. I’m sure he is. I don’t think a tournament like this really distracts him too much. It’s all about getting the green jacket in a couple of weeks.

Q. Mono is kind of a recurrent thing. Are you sort of talking to doctors as you go along? Are you having tests, or do you think it’s passed now?
ROGER FEDERER: I hope it’s passed. I guess there’s never a guarantee that it comes back, but I hope it doesn’t come back. It didn’t disturb me in a crazy way, you know. If you think about it, I still played semis of the Australian under the circumstances. Didn’t miss any tournaments at all, which is not a bad thing, considering.
Probably go and do one more check-up probably after Miami just to see how I’m doing. But really my heart rate’s doing well, you know. I’ve been monitoring that with my condition trainer. I’m happy the way I’m playing again out there.
You know, things feel good, anyway. But i haven’t been close to any setbacks, which is a good thing as well.

Q. How does the Swiss press treat you, Roger? We can’t read it. We don’t know. I don’t know if you even read it. But does it have any effect on you?
ROGER FEDERER: What do you mean, in general?

Q. In general. And now if they’re writing, Our boy is in a slump or something like that.
ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, usually they’re pretty good. I haven’t had too much trouble with them, you know. Some write too many things to try to sell papers, obviously, but you can’t stop that.
You know, I’m on a good basis with them because I see them too often to be on a bad level with them.

Q. You mentioned the media. Do you ever second guess yourself at this point in your career? Are you completely beyond that, or do you are have moments where you wonder about staying on top? And also, do you find this recent stretch motivating for you?
ROGER FEDERER: We have to remember that this is the plan I chose six months, nine months ago. So I knew that if I don’t play very well I’m not going to play many tournaments. But you have to understand that I picked this schedule to be in my best possible — best possible shape for what’s coming up, and that’s in the next few weeks and months ahead of me.
Especially through the French Open until the US Open where I’ll have four massive tournaments in a short span. This is really when I want to be at my peak.
The sickness just before the Australian Open was the biggest problem for me, because that really sort of set me back a little bit. But I still played, I thought, very well throughout the event, and just felt a little slow throughout. I played very well still, I think. And I lacked some matches, and that was going to happen. I knew that. But I’m used to that situation since many, many years.
I always take a month off, sometimes even two months, and come back and do well. But something happens every time. And for this reason there’s no need to second guess or panic whatsoever. I’m quite amazed what the headlines are at the moment, to be honest.

Q. Considering you were such a powerful advocate of Monte-Carlo’s tournament as a Masters Series, how grateful were you to see that it is voted as the ATP Tournament of the Year this year?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, surprised, because it’s one of the tournaments with the biggest hassle for me as a player. Even though I like the tournament, the fans are just outrageous over there. I can hardly move from the practice courts back to the locker room.
But honestly, the weather usually always works. The scenery with the ocean, it’s nice, you know, to see that voted by the players. It’s a beautiful tournament. I’m happy it’s still on the calendar, and I’ll definitely be playing it this year again.

Q. When people talk about other players trying to close the gap, the focus tends to be on Novak and Rafa. Is Andy Roddick part of that equation at this point? He’s had so much trouble against you head-to-head. Do you consider him among the very top rivals for you?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I would think so. Everybody who is in the top 10 is a rival to me. You know, even the No. 50 in the world, because I don’t choose the draw, you know. That’s somebody else who does that.
For me, I mean, I’m concentrating on my own thing, you know. If it happens that I’m going to stay No. 1 in the world for so long, it’s great. If it looks like it’s the future, that’s great, too. But I can’t control how the other guys play except when I play them. This is the tricky part about our sport.
But Andy’s definitely right up there. He puts himself into positions over and over again, where if the draw falls his way or he gets a good day when he needs it, that he could win a Grand Slam. I think that’s what it’s about for him.
He’s been No. 1 in the world before, So I don’t think that’s really the thing that motivates him the very most. I think it’s about winning Davis Cup, winning big titles, you know, like Dubai and the Master Series, like here, for instance, and then go on and try to win a Grand Slam. So, yeah, absolutely.

Q. What is Novak doing right now that’s making him so difficult to play?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think he’s just improved as a player in terms of, you know, his experience. You know, he’s moving well, very well at the moment, I think. He’s definitely, you know, played very strong on the outdoor hard courts. I think this is where the last few tournaments have been played, and he’s been very strong in Australia and then again in Indian Wells. Struggled last year in Shanghai, you know, which was quite a surprise.
But as a youngster, you always have your ups and downs. And your ups will be very high, you know, because there are no limits when you’re young. So he’s been playing really well, so it’s been impressive.

Q. Talk about how important this particular tournament is in terms of your schedule and getting back on track. Could you comment on confidence? Is that something that’s maybe overrated that we all sort of talk about and think it so critical, but maybe that’s just…
ROGER FEDERER: Confidence is very important. You sometimes can enter a tournament being totally confident and totally tired and still win it just through confidence, because, you know, you sort of recuperate throughout the event. Sort of just because you’re playing so well at the moment, that sort of carries you through.
Whereas maybe sometimes when you just play not as good, you know, you’re too concerned about too many little things, you know. But this tournament, to me, I mean, it’s important, you know, but it’s not important to what’s ahead.
Because after this I’m moving away from hard courts and I’m going on clay. So it’s a different total sport almost. This is where my focus will then change at the French Open. At the moment I’m just concentrating on doing well at this event.

Q. In Australia, you knew you were slower, you knew that you weren’t the Roger Federer that you used to be. Did you get angry with yourself?
ROGER FEDERER: No, not really.

Q. Did you ever say, Gosh darn it, why is this going on?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, remember the first two matches were great, those games. The third one was hard fought. I’m proud of myself to get through that one.
Blake and Berdych was sort of all right. I had a tough one. I sort of came through, didn’t play my best, so you’re analyzing in that type of way. Only then do you realize I’m just, you know, not as bouncy as usual.
Then especially I felt it against Djokovic when I really had to show the skills of defense, and I couldn’t come up with the shots. I couldn’t come back from a point. I couldn’t go from defense to offense. This is when I really realized something was just really weird.
I couldn’t figure out what it was, but then you move on. Say, Okay, I guess he had a good day. I didn’t have my best. Maybe I can do better. You forget about it. Then later when you sort of test is when you really sort of understand what really happened. But this is how I felt throughout the tournament. So you try to block it from your mind, then something would be really wrong.

Q. You mentioned the French Open. Is it more important to you this year than previously? And is it correct that you have one more clay court tournament in your schedule this year?
ROGER FEDERER: It’s going to stay as important as the last few years for me. I know that I have a real chance since the last three years, since I made my first semis, really, and the French really started to happen for me.
So it’s not more important than the last few years. Yes, I play Estoril, Monaco, week off, Rome, Hamburg, week off, Paris. So that’s my schedule.

Q. Why an extra clay court for you?
ROGER FEDERER: It’s quite simple actually. I used to miss Monaco for a couple of years. That gave me three or four weeks of practice on clay. Then I decided to play it after all, and then I always had two weeks between Monaco and Rome. So that gave me enough time also again to work on things and prepare.
This year, because of the change of the Olympic year, we only have one week in between. I could not really fit any practice on clay anyways, so I decided just to play. That’s why I want to play one extra tournament.

Q. Ten years ago was very important for my country, Chile, because Rios was No. 1 here. You were very young, but maybe you can remember something about that, about his career.
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I was a big admirer of Marcelo. I thought he was one of the players with the best talent around. He was one my favorite players at the time being.
Him and Pete Sampras back then were my favorite players.
Happy for him that he got to No. 1 in the world. Not happy that he never won a Grand Slam, you know. But I was fortunate enough to play him a few times and practice with him a few times. So, yeah, I have good memories of Marcelo.

Q. He will play against Sampras in a few weeks. What do you think about that match?
ROGER FEDERER: Good luck to Marcelo. It’s a tough match, but I think very interesting to the fans.

Q. You talked about the importance of confidence. Can you talk about where your confidence is right now? Are you kind of getting it back, or do you feel like you’re sort of raring to go?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, definitely confidence came back. I really needed — sometimes it only takes a match, you know. So I felt better right away much better after winning my first round in Indian Wells to losing the first round last year.
There’s always a little bit of doubt. I played well against Mahut and then also Ljubicic. It’s unfortunate I couldn’t play well against Tommy, because I think that would have been a good match for both us.
But you know, the match with Fish, you forget about it. You move on, you analyze it, then you look forward. I feel fine now. I’m motivated and I’m confident on the practice courts. We’ll see now in the match if it’s going to pay off, all the hard work I did in between.

End of FastScripts

Source: http://www.tennis-x.com/story/2008-03-28/h.php

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Excerpts from Andy Roddick’s 27 March interview. From Sarah. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 28, 2008

Andy Roddick talks to the media during day four of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 27, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)  

Sarah

Excerpts from Andy Roddick’s 27 March interview

http://www.sonyericssonopen.com/cont…327231453.html

Defending Federer …

Q. The top of men’s tennis now is really interesting. I mean, Novak and Roger are like two complete opposites in the rivalry, and you have Nadal and you. Can you just talk about the top of men’s tennis right now and how you fit in there?

ANDY RODDICK: Yes, I’m sure Roger would tell you he’s probably not playing his best right now. I mean, I was really happy for Mardy last week, but I think I was as surprised as anyone, especially at the convincing score line. That being said, you know, I think Roger’s earned the right for us to give him the benefit of the doubt.
…snip

Q. When somebody has been as dominant as Roger has been for so long, there is a tendency sometimes to jump to the conclusion rather quickly that he’s a little bit more vulnerable when he goes to one of these things. Do you see him as anymore vulnerable than he was at the top of his game?

ANDY RODDICK: Like I said, I don’t know that he’s played his best so far this year. Would it surprise me if he came in and won a tournament? No. You know, I think he said it in Australia, and he put it very well, that he’s created a bit of a monster for himself.
He was in the semis in an event and lost to a guy who is 3 in the world and who is legitimately probably been the second best player the last six months, and there’s like an uproar, or like a huge thing.
That’s just not him ‑‑ No. 3 guy beating a No. 1 guy in the semis of a Grand Slam isn’t unprecedented by any means. It’s just, you know, Roger has kind of created a monster where similar to Tiger Woods, where it’s not really a story about the guy winning, it’s about him losing last week to Ogilvie. Tiger lost, okay, but he’s playing against 100‑some odd guys. I mean, it’s him versus the field. In a way, I guess Roger would have to look at it as a backhanded compliment.
…snip

Q. What do you expect? When you’re No. 1 and you do usually win tournaments, by the end of March you’ve already won a couple of titles, and he hasn’t. Everyone’s not going to sit there and say everything’s normal in tennis.

ANDY RODDICK: No, and I’m not saying they should. It’s a little different. Even when Pete was No. 1, he could lose a match and it would be fine. It wouldn’t be a huge story. It would be, Sampras lost. But it wouldn’t be, There is something a little different here, and I think you would agree with that. Just the way he’s dominated, he has created a bit of a, like I said, a bit a monster that I know I haven’t seen since I’ve been a tennis fan. Not just since I’ve been on tour, but since I’ve been a fan.
…snip

Q. Roger Federer said in response to a question last session that playing well in recent matches has helped his confidence come back. Now I think the top athletes, like Michael Jordan or Tiger, their confidence is, I suspect, what they find inside of them maybe deep down rather than the results of a particular game or whatever.

ANDY RODDICK: I would completely 100% disagree with you. [Blunt force trauma to journo’s frontal lobe]

Q. Okay. So could you comment on that? [He’s not getting it, Andy.]

ANDY RODDICK: Sure. The thing about an athlete, you know, Michael Jordan had his moments. When he first came back he lost the series to the Orlando Magic, where he was the go, and the ball got stolen from him with 40 seconds left.
You don’t remember that because of how great he is normally. You’re probably not going to remember this stretch in Roger’s career ten years from now. Those great athletes have the benefit of retrospect now. You’re only going to remember their really high moments, because that’s what gets celebrated and gets etched in your mind.
The thing about being an athlete, every day you come to the office, you have to beat someone. It’s not like being an actor, you have one movie, you’re celebrated forever and you don’t need to do anything and that’s what you’re remembered for.
As an athlete, you have to come every day and beat the guy across the net from you. If he’s low in confidence and wins matches, I don’t see how you say that’s not going to help.
If you lose a couple matches in a row, that’s going to affect you. I don’t care if you’re Albert Einstein at the Intelligence Olympics, it’s going to affect you(smiling). [Blunt force trauma to journo’s parietal lobe]

Q. What I mean is not just waiting until you have the results to get your confidence. [Arghh, journo’s still not getting it.]

ANDY RODDICK: Okay, I have a question for you. [Blunt force trauma to journo’s occipital lobe] Okay, now if you’re a journalist and let’s say your last couple of stories have been crappy, even if you have ten years of good stories behind you, it’s going to weigh on you a little bit. You’re going to have a little more pressure to make that next story really good. [Blunt force trauma to journo’s temporal lobe] If you have a couple of good ones, that’s going to make you feel a lot better about the crappy ones. It’s no different being an athlete. You can’t simulate in practice what it takes to win an actual tennis match in the moment. [Splat! The sound of journo’s brain exploding]
You can’t recreate the ball kids, the atmosphere, everything. The only thing that can get your confidence back ‑‑ and I can tell you because I had a confidence crisis a couple years ago ‑‑ nothing can recreate that feeling than actually going out and doing it.
I can make a million balls in practice. The only thing that will make you feel better is going out and actually performing it. It is a process to build it back up.
Granted, his confidence is going to be more ingrained in his mind than probably any player on tour. That being said, it’s winning matches that helps make you feel better about the situation.

Q. If Roger’s confidence is down a little bit and he’s in a bit of a lull here, to what extent does that create an opportunity for you particularly in this tournament where you might face him?

ANDY RODDICK: Well, I got to get there, so it’s not even relevant for me right now. You know, I think the only way Roger could have just an absolute crisis of confidence and he’s still one of the best players in the world. There is no question about that. He’s earned that right. He’s still capable of playing terribly.
Kind of like Pete. Pete played terribly in all of 2002, came out and won the US Open. He’s a special player. He’s capable of that. Roger’s that same sort of thing. No matter how much everyone’s creating questions and whatever there is, he’s still capable of coming out and winning this tennis tournament. I don’t think anybody’s going to dispute that, and that’s what makes great players great.

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Holder Djokovic knocked out by qualifier in Miami. From Sarah and Adrian. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 28, 2008

Kevin Anderson, of South Africa, reacts after defeating Novak Djokovic 7-6 (1), 3-6, 6-4, during a second-round match at the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla., Friday, March 28, 2008.  
 
Sarah |

Holder Djokovic knocked out by qualifier in Miami
Fri Mar 28, 2008 9:01pm GMT

MIAMI, Florida (Reuters) – Holder Novak Djokovic was upset by qualifier Kevin Anderson of South Africa 7-6 3-6 6-4 in his opening match at the Sony Ericsson Open on Friday.

The third-seeded Djokovic, who won the Pacific Life Open last week, could not handle the power of the lanky Anderson, who seemed remarkably coordinated for a tall player.

“In the last point my shoelace was broken but I’m not trying to find excuses,” said Australian Open champion and world number three Djokovic. “He deserved to win.”

The Serbian initially looked in control of the final set when he went ahead 2-0 but the 122nd-ranked Anderson immediately mounted a charge that his stunned opponent could not handle.

Anderson, who reached this month’s Las Vegas Open final as a qualifier, double faulted on his first match point at 40-15 in the 10th game but won the match on his second when Djokovic netted a forehand after a lengthy and entertaining rally.

(Editing by Ken Ferris)

http://uk.reuters.com/article/tennisNews/idUKL2822440620080328 

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after losing a point to Kevin Anderson, of South Africa, during a second-round match at the Sony Ericsson Open tennis tournament in Key Biscayne, Fla., Friday, March 28, 2008. Anderson won 7-6 (1), 3-6, 6-4.  

Adrian

Can I just tell you HOW HAPPY I am of this loss by Djoko?!?!? Don’t get me wrong, I am actually a huge fan of his (and of Federer’s, going back to the discussion we had a couple of days ago)… but after all of his cocky, arrogant remarks, I want him to lose for a while now, become a bit more humble, and then come back GRACEFULLY. Djokovic suffers shock Miami loss
Novak Djokovic suffered a shock defeat by South African qualifier Kevin Anderson at the Sony Ericsson Open.
BBC Sport

Defending champion Djokovic arrived in Miami as the form player having won in Indian Wells last week but lost 7-6 (7-1) 3-6 6-4 to the world number 122.

The third seed, who had a first-round bye, was broken in game five of the decider and Anderson served out to win.

In earlier women’s matches, Justine Henin, Serena Williams and Svetlana Kuznetsova all made progress.

Belgium’s Henin was playing for the first time since defeat by Francesca Schiavone in Dubai last month, and saw off Germany’s Angelique Kerber 6-4 6-2.

“I feel much better physically today than I did a few weeks ago – that’s for sure,” said Henin, who has struggled with a knee injury.

“So we could see it in my serve, I can play with my forehand again and I feel that everything is better now.”

Local favourite Williams thrashed Edina Gallovits 6-1 6-2, while third seed Kuznetsova beat Yung-Jan Chan 6-1 3-6 6-0.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/7319389.stm 

Sarah |

Kevin Anderson vs Novak Djokovic

7-6 3-6 6-4

Novak is OUT!

I wonder how many points he will lose?

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Ana Ivanovic in pitchkers at Indian Wells.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 28, 2008

Ana Ivanovic arrives for an awards ceremony during day four of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 27, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images) 

Ana Ivanovic of Serbia holds the Pacific Life Open trophy after defeating Russia's Svetlana Kuznetsova in the women's final at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden in Indian Wells, California. Ivanovic defeated Kuznetsova 6-4, 6-3. 

Ana Ivanovic of Serbia returns a shot to Svetlana Kuznetsova of Russia during their final tennis match at the Pacific Life Open, Sunday, March 23, 2008, in Indian Wells, Calif.   

Ana Ivanovic poses with her awards during day four of the Sony Ericsson Open at the Crandon Park Tennis Center on March 27, 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images) 

Ana Ivanovic of Serbia poses with the Pacific Life Open trophy after winning the women's final by defeating Svetlana Kuznetsova of Russia during the Pacific Life Open at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden March 23, 2008 in Indian Wells, California.  Ivanovic won the match 6-4, 6-3.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images) 

Ana Ivanovic, of Serbia, celebrates during a match against Svetlana Kuznetsova, of Russia, in the finals of the Pacific Life Open tennis tournament in Indian Wells, Calif., Sunday, March 23, 2008.   
Ana Ivanovic of Serbia poses with the trophy after winning the women's final by defeating Svetlana Kuznetsova of Russia at the Pacific Life Open at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden March 23, 2008 in Indian Wells, California.  Ivanovic won the match 6-4, 6-3.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

Ana Ivanovic of Serbia smiles as she speaks to the media during the Pacific Life Open at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden on March 12, 2008 in Indian Wells, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images) 

Ana Ivanovic of Serbia reacts after winning a point over Ioana Raluca Olaru of Romania during their second round tennis match at the Pacific Life Open, Saturday, March 15, 2008, in Indian Wells, Calif.   

Posted in Uncategorized | 9 Comments »

Women, Want a Healthy Marriage? Marry Man Uglier Than You, Study Says.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 28, 2008

The best marriages are those where women marry men who are less attractive than themselves, research has found.

Click here for more.

Is this the reason women are hounding Stepanek and Canas?

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

Looking at Nadal’s face, I’m surprised every top tennis player doesn’t end up with skin cancer.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 28, 2008

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Some tough opening round matches for the seeds coming up.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 28, 2008

-Federer vs Isner?

-Murray vs Ancic.

-Gasquet vs Tursunov.

-Berdych vs Querrey.

-Ljubicic vs Santoro.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Watch Nadal and Serena play on water.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 27, 2008

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

Parrot in Japan beats humans in solving chain puzzle.

Posted by tennisplanet on March 27, 2008

Click here.

Posted in Parrot in Japan beats humans in solving chain puzzle. | 2 Comments »