Tennis Planet

Official Freaking Site Of Tennis Freaking Fans Worldwide.

Archive for April 15th, 2008

Wanna photo? From Dee. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

Advertisements

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

Serena’s remarks glorifies Santoro, but what about Djokovic, Roddick and others? Will she or can she play them?

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

Serena Williams, seenhere on April 05, 2008, may have successfully defended her title at the WTA Sony Ericsson Open at the weekend but she dropped one place in the WTA rankings released on Monday. 

Serena on the Charleston draw, which is now missing Henin and has Sharapova drawn in the same quarter as Serena: “I’ll play anybody with the exception of Nadal, Federer and Santoro. Other than that, I’m open for anybody.”

Andy Roddick reacts during his Davis Cup tennis quarterfinals match against France's Paul-Henri Mathieu, in Winston-Salem, N.C., Sunday, April 13, 2008. Roddick defeated Mathieu  6-2, 6-3, 6-2 to clinch the win.  

Serena has long expressed her desire to play on the mens circuit. Why not give her a chance and declare her a winner if her racket touches the ball the entire match? And choose players past the top 50 ONLY. That will satisfy her urges once and for all, if they are all tennis related that is!!!!!!!!!!

Novak Djokovic of Serbia serves to Mardy Fish during the men's final match at the Pacific Life Open at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden March 23, 2008 in Indian Wells, California.  Djokovic won the match 6-2, 5-7, 6-3.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images) 

You think jokers will come out in herds to watch the match? You bet!!!! Didn’t Billie Jean King have some such circus and won back in the dark ages, when women wore evening lace dresses with tiaras on the court and men wore pants?

Posted in Uncategorized | 5 Comments »

Someone needs a hug. My ‘where I live’ door is open. You are already in the US and have time. What better opportunity?

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

Number three seed Anna Chakvetadze, of Russia, throws her head back in frustration during her upset loss, 2-6, 6-1, 2-6 to Sorana Cirstea, of Romania,during the second round of the Family Circle Cup tennis tournament, in Charleston, S.C. on Tuesday, April 15, 2008.

Come on down for a thorough pampering session and more. You will not regret it.

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

Federer and Davydenko tracker at Estoril. Will they meet in the finals?

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

Joker Aces D. faults Ist serve
pct.
Sets lost Time on court. Bk pt conv pct. Matches played
Federer 35 5 62 2 6:06 55 4
               
Davydenko 8 11 64 2 6:32 63 4
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Seeds vanishing like ghosts at Estoril defeating the very purpose of it being a legitimate warm up event for Federer.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

All seeds in Federer’s half, except one, are gone. On the other side, Karlovic the No. 3 seed is out leaving just five seeds in the entire tournament and we haven’t even played the second round.

Is this the competition that’s going to get you ready for the big four tournaments and test the viability of the coaching strategy of a new coach?

Federer is looking at No. 68 Hanescu in the next round and then he has to play either a qualifier or a wild card in the next. That should get you in top shape for the crucial clay season for so many reasons.

And then if the only seed in his half, some Berrer, survives the gruelling march through tomato cans, he will be his next round opponent with Davydenko to follow.

The climate shift seems quite abrupt or is it just the weather these days? Who knows Federer could end up in the finals against Machado, a wild card, who ‘beat’ Karlovic in the first round.

That should help keep things moving in the right direction, don’t you think?

Posted in Uncategorized | 11 Comments »

Unfreakingbelievable!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

signagefail.jpg

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

Good and bad of Federer’s win over Rochus in three freaking sets in two freaking hours.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

World number one tennis player Roger Federer, from Switzerland, scratches his head during his first round match of the Estoril Tennis Open  in Oeiras, outside Lisbon, Tuesday, April 15 2008. Federer defeated Belgium's Olivier Rochus 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.  

Good:

-It was a much needed workout against a comparatively quality opponent in recent months which Federer won.

-Federer may have actually felt the full force of pain and pleasure of Jose’s blueprint on clay. He may have reached half way on his decision to continue or break away from his new partnership. This was the proverbial first impression for Federer from Jose.

-Come from behind victories, more often than not, are good in the long run, under normal circumstances. They should be specially supporting and uplifting if you are where Federer is now AND on a difficult surface under a new freaking coach. There must have been a moment during the match when the Murray ghost must have appeared in Federer’s rear view mirror, and to have overcome that after losing the first set should be a huge confidence booster.

-With many ‘NEW’ at this match, it could help Federer get more comfortable with the newness as he gets deeper in the draw with nothing but tomato cans lined up from here to Timbuktu.

-As I have mentioned earlier, Federer appears to lose matches where his first serve percentage is at or below 65 percent. He served just 58% here and still won, meaning his all around game came to his rescue, as was the case when he was dominating the tour. He won 89% of his first serve point to prove the point.

-With Karlovic already out, this may turn out to be the only real match for Federer before he faces Davydenko in the finals unless Davydenko is open to accept bribes from Nadal and Djokovic and retire also.

Swiss tennis player Roger Federer wipes his nose during a training session at Jamor Stadium in Lisbon on April 14, 2008 in Estoril. Federer starts the competition at Estoril Open on April 15, facing Belgium's Olivier Rochus. AFP PHOTO/ FRANCISCO LEONG (Photo credit should read FRANCISCO LEONG/AFP/Getty Images) 

Bad:

-Could he have won this match without the 17 freaking aces? The aces could have been more because of a midget across the net than because of some top class serving. But if his serve is going to bail him out every freaking time, the law of averages will eventually kick in without the backing of other weapons. He had 8 aces in the first set, and 4 and 5 in the last two. Federer was able to pull it off this time against the world’s No. 77 who is not a clay court specialist, but as he gets to the deep end of the pool, his overall game has to compensate for the slow surface to get the wins consistently. This serve is both a boon and a downer for this match, but in the long run this streak cannot pull the ship out of the storm on it’s own.

-Break point conversion was a big factor in Federer losing last year’s Roland Garros final to Nadal. He converted just ONE of the 17 freaking break points he had against Nadal. That’s freaking 5 percent!!!!! JUST ONE!!!! Well, he had 13 here and converted just three. He had six in the first set alone and he converted a whopping ZERO of them. Rochus had two the entire match and he converted one of them for 50 % score. That has got to be purely mental and the blame rests squarely on Federer’s confidence truck.

-I feel Federer was executing Jose’s strategy in the first set, at the expense of his own intuition to see how far he can take it. When it fell flat for whatever reason(s), he went back to his own natural game to dig this one out. Considering Federer is committing to Jose for just one week, it may not be a good omen for the relationship.

-This off again on again coaching arrangement is not the best scenario for Federer at this point of, not only his career but at this point of the season too. He needs to do his homework once and for all and fully commit to the partnership. This tentativeness and ambiguity can prove fatal and decisive. This is not the time to be playing these games. If he is not sure, I would rather see him go it alone than indulge in this flip flopping.

Posted in Uncategorized | 4 Comments »

Federer-Olivier photos. What is that swelling under Federer’s right eye? Or is it just gravity already at work?

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

World number one tennis player Roger Federer, from Switzerland, steers a remote control model car at the end of his first round match of the Estoril Tennis Open in Oeiras, outside Lisbon, Tuesday, April 15 2008. Federer defeated Belgium's Olivier Rochus 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.  

Belgium's Olivier Rochus returns a ball to Roger Federer, from Switzerland, during their first round match of the Estoril Tennis Open in Oeiras, outside Lisbon, Tuesday, April 15 2008. Federer defeated Rochus 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.  

World number one tennis player Roger Federer, from Switzerland, returns a ball to Belgium's Olivier Rochus during their first round match of the Estoril Tennis Open in Oeiras, outside Lisbon, Tuesday, April 15 2008. Federer defeated Belgium's Olivier Rochus 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.

Belgium's Olivier Rochus(L) is assisted by a doctor during his tennis match against Swiss player Roger Federer in the first round of Estoril Open at Jamor Stadium in Lisbon on April 15, 2008. Federer won 4-6, 6-3 and 6-2. AFP PHOTO/ FRANCISCO LEONG (Photo credit should read FRANCISCO LEONG/AFP/Getty Images) 
Swiss tennis player Roger Federer returns a forehand to Belgium's Olivier Rochus in the first round of Estoril Open at Jamor Stadium in Lisbon on April 15, 2008. Federer won 4-6, 6-3 and 6-2. AFP PHOTO/ FRANCISCO LEONG (Photo credit should read FRANCISCO LEONG/AFP/Getty Images) 

Belgium's Olivier Rochus waves as he leaves the court after loosing to Swiss Roger Federer (not pictured) during the first round of the Estoril Open at Jamor Stadium in Lisbon on April 15, 2008. Federer won 4-6, 6-3 and 6-2. AFP PHOTO/ FRANCISCO LEONG (Photo credit should read FRANCISCO LEONG/AFP/Getty Images) 

Swiss tennis player Roger Federer salutes fans after beating Belgium's Olivier Rochus (not pictured) in the first round of the Estoril Open at Jamor Stadium in Lisbon on April 15, 2008. Federer won 4-6, 6-3 and 6-2. AFP PHOTO/ FRANCISCO LEONG (Photo credit should read FRANCISCO LEONG/AFP/Getty Images)

World number one tennis player Roger Federer, from Switzerland, applauds supporters at the end of his first round match of the Estoril Tennis Open  in Oeiras, outside Lisbon, Tuesday, April 15 2008. Federer defeated Belgium's Olivier Rochus 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.  
Olivier Rochus of Belgium returns a backhand to Swiss Roger Federer (not pictured) during the first round of the Estoril Open at Jamor Stadium in Lisbon on April 15, 2008. Federer won the match 4-6, 6-3 and 6-2. AFP PHOTO/ FRANCISCO LEONG (Photo credit should read FRANCISCO LEONG/AFP/Getty Images) 
World number one tennis player Roger Federer, from Switzerland, scratches his head during his first round match of the Estoril Tennis Open  in Oeiras, outside Lisbon, Tuesday, April 15 2008. Federer defeated Belgium's Olivier Rochus 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.  
World number one tennis player Roger Federer, from Switzerland, eyes the ball during his first round match of the Estoril Tennis Open  in Oeiras, outside Lisbon, Tuesday, April 15 2008. Federer defeated Belgium's Olivier Rochus 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.  

Posted in Uncategorized | 14 Comments »

The Artful Roger Federer. From Sarah. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

Swiss tennis player Roger Federer returns a forehand to Belgium's Olivier Rochus during the first round of the Estoril Open at Jamor Stadium in Lisbon. Federer won4-6, 6-3, 6-2. 

The Artful Roger Federer

By Cindy Shmerler, TENNIS Magazine

Excerpted from the March 2003 issue of TENNIS Magazine

Although it was late August and sweltering in New York City, the players’ dining room at the U.S. Open looked like a terminal at O’Hare during a blizzard. Bodies and gear were strewn everywhere, every available seat was taken, and all the tables were occupied by players, coaches, and camp followers. Everyone was swept up in the buzz of the last major championship of the 2002 season.

Everyone, that is, but the No. 13 seed, Roger Federer. The 21-year-old Swiss sensation and Grand Slam champion-in-waiting sat slumped in an oversized chair at a big wooden dining table in a remote corner, oblivious to the chaos. All he was in-waiting for at the moment was the bowl of pasta with which his Swedish coach, Peter Lundgren, had finally appeared. Lundgren slid it across the table to his protégé.

Federer, fresh from a post-practice shower, wore his shoulder-length brown hair pulled into a ponytail, enhancing the already marked prominence of his nose. He has thick eyebrows, à la Pete Sampras, and hints of adolescent acne. But his imperfections seem inconsequential when he smiles. And Federer smiles often, even as he tried to assess how a year that began with so much promise-he won an Australian Open tune-up and came within a point of making the quarterfinals in Melbourne before losing to Tommy Haas 8-6 in the fifth-had spiraled out of control, leaving him winless in his last two Grand Slam appearances. Once again, pundits had started questioning if he would ever realize his potential.

“One good thing about me,” Federer said, without a trace of irony, “is that I forget matches, even bad matches, very quickly. I get sad about not having played well, but I don’t really get pissed off. By the time I get back to the hotel, it’s completely forgotten and I’m fine again.”

Unfortunately, neither Federer’s fans nor his critics forget quite so readily. They’ve been conditioned to expect the best ever since Federer’s striking, silky-smooth game earned him the International Tennis Federation’s No. 1 junior ranking in 1998 and, by extension, billing as the game’s next star. Instead, they’ve watched Federer’s halting progress with frustration, especially in his native, star-starved Switzerland.

As Rene Stauffer, tennis correspondent for the Zurich-based newspaper Tages Anzeiger, says, “Roger is different from Martina Hingis [a native of the Slovak Republic]. He really is ours, he’s the guy from next door-he was even a ball boy at the Basel tournament. Roger can become a national hero, but not if he just stays in the Top Fifteen [he ended 2002 ranked No. 6]. They want him to win Grand Slams. And this may be a problem, because he doesn’t have [Lleyton] Hewitt’s fighting spirit. We haven’t seen him put his heart down there on the court.”

That Federer can be so highly touted and still trigger so many questions about his competitive makeup is a tribute to his pure talent. He moves like Sampras and strikes the ball with comparably clean strokes, seemingly generating power at his leisure. An inventive all-court player, Federer has every shot in the book, including a reflex volley reminiscent of John McEnroe at his best.

Federer has shown flashes of greatness. He almost single-handedly knocked the United States out of the first round of the Davis Cup in 2001, and almost five months later he snapped Sampras’ 31-match Wimbledon win streak. Early last year, he upset Hewitt en route to the final at Key Biscayne (where he lost to Andre Agassi). That May, Federer, who lost his first 11 pro matches on clay, beat Gustavo Kuerten and Marat Safin on that surface, in the same week, to win his first Tennis Masters Series title, in Hamburg, Germany.

“This guy is the real deal, and his game is the whole package,” says U.S. Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe. “He can hit from anywhere on the court and he moves with elegance. His volleys are impressive. He knows every angle out there. Sampras may have more serving firepower, but Roger strikes the shot in the same effortless way.”

Agassi adds, “He’s young and explosive and has a powerful game. He has some of the best hand speed on the tour and he knows how to put pressure on you. There are a lot of things he does well.”

Still, Federer has fallen from the high wire at the Slams (he didn’t reach a quarterfinal until the eighth major of his career), showing an infuriating talent for following up his biggest successes with inexplicable losses. For instance, the week after his triumph in Hamburg, he was ushered out of Roland Garros on opening day by Moroccan journeyman Hicham Arazi. Worse yet, a few weeks later at Wimbledon, Federer was upset by Mario Ancic-ranked No. 154 in the world-in straight sets.

“I never really felt I was playing well on grass,” Federer said of that debacle. “I never felt comfortable. I practiced with Tim Henman the day before and I got my butt kicked. Maybe that was on my mind a little, too.”

Those comments may be more noteworthy for what they reveal about Federer’s fragile psyche than his game. As Lundgren admits, “Roger just panicked at Wimbledon. For the first time ever, he started to feel the pressure and he got very uncomfortable on the court. After, he felt sad and empty.”

While in Canada a month later, Federer had his first brush with a different kind of sadness when he learned that his mentor, 37-year-old Australian coach and Swiss Davis Cup Captain Peter Carter, had been killed in a car accident in South Africa. Federer says, “Peter wasn’t my first coach, but he was my real coach. I made trips with him. He knew me and my game, and he was always thinking of what was good for me.”

The one-two punch of frustration in tennis and Carter’s death bewildered Federer, who still wasn’t far removed from the warm cocoon provided by his family and life in decidedly low-key Basel.

The first junior match Roger Federer ever played, in Basel, turned out to be against a fellow named Reto Schmidli, and it was a 6-0, 6-0 rubout. Federer describes that match as “special” because it is the only double-bagel of his career. The remarkable thing about this revelation is that Federer actually lost the match.

It is typical of the easygoing Federer to give a rival his due- other top pros would have deleted the word “Schmidli” from their mental hard drives. But as fellow pro Jonas Bjorkman, among others, has observed, “Roger, he’s a really great guy. He respects people.”

In turn, nearly everyone holds Federer in high esteem, from his peers to the game’s young fans, for whom he signs nearly every piece of paper or giant tennis ball thrust toward him. As Rene Stauffer says, “Roger lives that saying, ‘It’s nice to be important but it’s important to be nice.’ This is a guy who buys drinks for photographers and thanks reporters who show up to his press conferences.”

This sort of thing flies well with the civil Swiss, for whom Federer is a perfect antidote to the outspoken, tart Hingis. OK, Federer may have a borderline-alarming passion for American professional wrestling, and he’s neither a teetotaler nor a shut-in while on the road (on one notable occasion, Dominik Hrbaty and two hockey-playing buddies, one being L.A. Kings’ star Ziggy Palffy, showed the impressionable Federer the ropes of L.A.’s nightlife). But in the ways that really matter, Federer is a solid, well-mannered young man, modest and friendly-a good burgher.

Although Basel is a commercial center with a rich, 2000-year history, the oldest university in Switzerland, cathedrals, more than 30 museums, and the internationally renowned Theater Basel, Federer finds it “nondescript.” In fact, he describes Basel as a place of “no’s”-as in “no lakes, no mountains, just a big river [the Rhine] that flows through the middle of the city.”

Federer grew up 10 minutes from Basel proper, in suburban Münchenstein. His father, Robert, met Roger’s South-African-born mother, Lynette, while on a business trip for Ciba-Geigy, South Africa (they both still work for the pharmaceutical giant.) Roger has a 23-year-old sister, Diana, who is a nursing student.

The only thing about the area that seems to tug at Federer’s heartstrings is his family and friends. While most people of his age-and financial wherewithal-lust for their own digs, Federer recently invested fifty-fifty with his parents in a new, bigger home in the nearby hillside town of Bottmingen. (He also shares an apartment near the Swiss national training center in Biel.)

“My family is the thing I miss most on the tour,” Federer admits. “Why should I have my own place? Who is going to clean it for me?”

Given those priorities, it’s easy to understand how Federer ended up dating a fair approximation of the girl next door, WTA pro Miroslava Vavrinec, who is Swiss (by way of the Slovak Republic). They met during the opening ceremonies of the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney. Those Olympics, in which Federer narrowly missed winning a bronze medal, provide such sweet memories for him that a lot of wall space in his bedroom is eaten up by a giant framed photograph of the opening ceremonies. “My parents and girlfriend want to put up pictures of me in the house, but I’m not ready for that,” he says. “But I do ask photographers for pictures of the nice places I play, like the U.S. Open. I prefer that.”

Federer was introduced to the game by parents who at best were weekend hackers. His earliest tennis-related memory is of watching his idol, Boris Becker, battle Stefan Edberg on television in the 1988 Wimbledon final. When Becker lost, Federer wept. His boyhood friends encouraged Federer to switch allegiances to Edberg on the grounds that Becker was “kind of weird,” but Federer stayed the course. “Over time, though,” he says, “I learned to appreciate Edberg.”

As a youth, Federer was far more like the fiery German than the cool Swede. “I was hotheaded, always acting bad on the court, throwing my racquets like ten meters from me, or into the curtain,” Federer says sheepishly. “My parents hated it. When I acted badly and lost, they would say nothing during the car ride home, which was the worst. But I just couldn’t keep my emotions under control.”

It’s hard to imagine the calm, soft-spoken Federer of today broadcasting his woes and throwing tantrums. But he remained a brat until Carter and, later, Lundgren convinced him that emotional outbursts were a waste of energy.

Carter, the Swiss Davis Cup coach at the time of his death, worked with Federer from ages 10 to 14, and then off and on until early 1999, when Lundgren took over. At 15, Federer was tucked under the wing of the Swiss federation and farmed out for two full years to a national training center, then at Ecublens, near Lausanne. The facility was more than two hours by train from Basel, and in the French (as opposed to Basel’s German) region of the nation. That complicated young Roger’s life in more ways than one.

“I never liked school to begin with,” Federer says. “But it was the worst at Ecublens because I couldn’t speak the language and I didn’t know anybody. And of course, they were making fun of me.”

But Federer flourished at tennis, slashing his way through the junior ranks. In 1998, his last year as a junior, Federer won the Wimbledon singles and doubles and the prestigious Orange Bowl title. A year later, he had cracked the ATP Top 100, and he won his first title as a pro, at Milan, in 2001. The FEDERER EXPRESS headlines were too tempting to resist, even though they didn’t exactly represent truth in advertising: Delivery was-and still is-pending.

Complete article appears in March 2003 issue of TENNIS Magazine.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Nadal hits out at 2009 ATP schedule. From Jenny. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

Rafael Nadal of Spain reacts after he won the first set in a tie break during his Tennis Davis Cup World Group Quarterfinal match against Nicolas Kiefer of Germany in Bremen, northern Germany, Friday, April 11, 2008. 

Jenny

NADAL HITS OUT AT 2009 ATP SCHEDULE: The 2009 ATP schedule is out, and Rafael Nadal and other European players are angry at calendar concessions given to the U.S. Indian Wells and Miami tournaments, with the European Masters Series events on clay played closer together: “It’s an outrageous way to treat European and claycourt players. The truth is the ATP is making our lives almost impossible. Moving Miami and Indian Wells back because of college basketball is something I understand because it’s very important to them but this is a world tour. We only have three Masters Series events and we have to play them with an important tournament like Barcelona all running together. I’m tired of complaining about this but the people in charge of this don’t share my opinion and I have to respect that.”

Not wishing to upset our American friends, but from a European perspective and clay court fan, I’m behind Rafael 100%. These clay court boys are going to be absolutely knackered.

Posted in Uncategorized | 10 Comments »

Federer wins after Rochus scare. From Sarah. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

Belgium's Olivier Rochus returns a ball to Roger Federer, from Switzerland, during their first round match of the Estoril Tennis Open in Oeiras, outside Lisbon, Tuesday, April 15 2008. Federer defeated Rochus 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.  

Sarah

Federer wins after Rochus scare

Roger Federer was far below his best when winning on Tuesday
Roger Federer overcame the loss of the first set against Belgium’s Olivier Rochus to win his first-round match at the Estoril Open 4-6 6-3 6-2.

Rochus broke the world number one in the seventh game of the match thanks to two wonderful backhand returns down the line and a Federer double-fault.

But the Swiss superstar finally broke for the first time in the second set when Rochus sent a backhand wide.

Federer made errors in the deciding set, but ultimately won it comfortably.

His performance during the second half of the first set was particularly worrying in the first week of clay-court action of the year.

Rochus, the world number 77 who stands only 5ft 6in tall, forced Federer into long rallies and was frequently rewarded with mistakes from his more exalted opponent.

But Federer – whose serve (with 17 aces) was a vital weapon throughout – found a little more poise from the start of the second set and was rarely troubled after breaking Rochus.

That said, there was little to suggest that his new partnership with Spanish clay-court coach Jose Higueras would necessarily provide him with his first tournament success of the year.

Earlier Russia’s Nikolay Davydenko – Federer’s main challenger in Portugal – breezed into the second round with a straight-sets win over Jurgen Melzer.

The number two seed and world number four beat his Austrian opponent, 74th in the world, 6-3 6-1.

Third-seeded Ivo Karlovic of Croatia retired injured while losing 6-4, 1-0 against Rui Machado of Portugal.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/7349196.stm

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

We are half way there. I knew it!!!!!!!!

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

Pants Down

Posted in Uncategorized | 7 Comments »

When your spouse is a slob. Maybe all I need is to get Mini to visit my basement once to dodge the bullet. Who knew this mess could one day become a blessing!!! I must be a genius.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 15, 2008

Click here for more.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »