Tennis Planet

Official Freaking Site Of Tennis Freaking Fans Worldwide.

Archive for April 27th, 2008

Federer’s strategy against Nadal. From pommesdesuisse. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 27, 2008

Roger Federer of Switzerland hits backhand during his 5-7,5-7 defeat in the singles final match against Rafael Nadal of Spain on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club, April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) 

pommesdesuisse

Now once and for all…:

Nadal didn’t lose because of fatigue last year in Hamburg. He won the first set with 6 to 2, remember?
You only ‘feel’ your legs when you’re losing, which means something has to lead you to ‘Losing Street’ first!
Ok…maybe when you played 9 hours of high intensity tennis in 2 days and you’re gonna have to play on the third (consecutive) day, too with blisters, aching back and stuff, then you have a fatigue (the only ‘real’ Djokovic-retirement at Wimbledon semi in ‘07)

Was that the case??

He lost because Federer was playing the right way. And Federer was playing the right way for some phase today as well.

And now may I have your attention, please…:

When do you think – means at what point do you think does a ball played with a top-spin have it’s ‘biggest’ impact, spin-wise??
Well…I tell you: right after hitting the ground!!!

And now think about Rafa’s top-spin!!

And now think about this:
Do you think it’s a good idea to take that ball in the rise??!!
When there is maximum spin on it??!!
Rafa’s maximum spin??!!
Do you think you can generate the best possible control over that ball??!!

Is this a brainer?!

Roger won his match in Hamburg last year, because he was not running ‘around’ his backhand all the time to take every ball with the forehand, but being – very important – NOT TOO CLOSE to the ball, but letting the ball coming down again (or hitting it at the highest point, which is not a problem when it’s not a murder top-spin) to then generate – very important – lots of top-spin and enough length himself. And I’m not just talking about the backhand. It’s also the forehand.

And it worked out!

So why did he lose today? Because he was obviously on a very good way…

Well…here you’re right, TP:

It’s all mental! Nothing more, nothing less.

And now this:

In what kind of situation do you think it’s mostly important to stick with the game-plan, no matter what?
When you feel safe??!! Or when you tend to panic??!!

Now is this a brainer, too?!

So…
It’s all in your hands, Rog.
And it’s all in your brains.

Just go for it!!!

Posted in Uncategorized | 5 Comments »

Nadal should learn from last year’s Hamburg debacle and skip Barcelona.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 27, 2008

Rafael Nadal of Spain returns the ball to Swiss player Roger Federer during their final of the Monte Carlo Tennis Open tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  

Rome and Hamburg are back to back Masters Series events just like Montreal and Cincinnati, with not even a day separating them. By electing to play at Barcelona you now have three events, back to back to back, with not even a day between them.

Last year’s loss to Federer in the final, can in most part be blamed to the third Barcelona title and the subsequent fatigue. Although it’s 300 points, but if you can win Hamburg instead, for 500 points, wouldn’t that make up for it in more than one way? You would lose just 150 points (final is 350 pts), but gain a Masters event, and who knows if Federer will be in the final this year. So that may more than compensate for the point deficit. More importantly it will keep you fresh for Roland Garros and beyond.

What makes you so sure that last year will not repeat itself if you are not changing anything this year? If you can gain about the same number of points by playing one less event, wouldn’t that figure in your plans to keep yourself fresh for the bigger, juicier titles?

What can be the other logic for running yourself in the ground with your track record of last two years staring you in the face? Nadal’s second half of the season for the last two years was riddled with injuries, for rock people. Geeeeeezzzzzzzz!!!!!!!!!

Skip Barcelona and win Hamburg. Simple as that.

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

This photo speaks volumes about Nadal as a human being.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 27, 2008

Rafael Nadal of Spain, left, with his victory cup, reacts with Roger Federer of Switzerland, during the final of the Monte Carlo Tennis Open tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  

Nadal knows how close Federer was this time, maybe closer than even the five setter at Rome in 2006. Add the current state Federer is in, and this, Nadal knows, must be stinging real hard.

So what does Nadal do? He uses his body language to convey his condolences – sincerely and with great respect – to keep it exactly in line. Notice his facial expression and you can read his soul, I think.

This is one of the best photos I have seen in a long time, irrespective of sport or whatever.

It truly shows Nadal thinking from the other person’s perspective – genuinely. He did not have to do that.

If this doesn’t move you, you are not tough, you are freaking dead even though you may have a pulse.

GREAT JOB, NADAL. WE ARE PROUD OF YOU.

Posted in This photo speaks volumes about Nadal as a human being. | 25 Comments »

Is it a good idea for Jose to be ‘retiring’ until Roland Garros?

Posted by tennisplanet on April 27, 2008

What can be the freaking rationale behind it? He is going back to prepare some magic potion in his backyard to bring with him for RG? Are you freaking kidding me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

You have just won your first title and had a nine match winning streak for the first time this year – ON CLAY – and you are sending the coach back? Shouldn’t he be continuing to work through the next two tournaments to ensure you peak at Roland Garros?

If whatever he has been doing is working at this critical point of your career and season, why would you break that momentum. What? He has to train some teenagers back home at his academy?

Unless of course, you feel his input is not effective enough to warrant a continued session. What other reason can it be? Why would you jeapardise a good thing? Is he asking for too much money?

My famous example of how much force a rocket needs to take off compared to how much it needs to continue its journey once comfortably high in space, might fit in here, don’t you think? How about out of sight out of mind? We are talking an absence of about a month before Roland Garros.

Is this another retirement, unforced retirement, if you please, that may have an impact here and beyond? It seems likely.

Jose should not only remain with Federer, if his sermons are working, but should be on board on full time basis by now. I cannot recall of any successful coach-player relationship that is severed for a month smack in the middle of a vitally important season.

Why the indecisiveness and tentativeness? Make the decision either way and move on. There’s enough material in the bag by now to base the decision on.

Posted in Uncategorized | 7 Comments »

OK, very reluctantly, I do thank you for your ‘wanna post’ contributions.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 27, 2008

Would you mind working at your freaking job for a change instead of running around the Internet digging out ‘interesting’ posts, while at work? If I didn’t have a herd to take care of, I could have done all that myself.

So don’t get too big on me, just because you are able to cut and paste. When I first started this ‘wanna post’ BS, I actually took it down after a day or so, thinking it was a stupid idea thinking freaks like you wouldn’t have anything worthwhile and sensible to say anyway. But I am really surprised by the frequency of the posts and OK slightly on how timely and sensible they have been lately. I don’t mean the latter part, it’s only for the purpose of this post.

The thank you’s you receive from fellow freaks, for the posts are really genuine and heart felt, for I realized I am not the only lazy lunatic in this world. OK the only one in a basement with goats, maybe.

I can understand the enormous effort you must have to make to move yourself to do a good deed without any compensation. Or are you in it for something that I have yet to figure out? Don’t mess with me, I have told you time and again. I am the kind of guy who eats an apple without even washing it and that means a lot if you live where AND like I live. Besides aren’t you scared of my ‘boys’? I know you are after something because freaks like you can never do anything without anything in return.

I think you freaks are smarter than I think and you are actually controlling me. You’re messing with the wrong guy, I am telling you. Just put everything on the table NOW and tell me what are your real goals. You think it’s nice to manipulate someone as innocent and unbrashlike like me?

Posted in Uncategorized | 4 Comments »

Gary Coleman divorces after eight months. Only clowns surprised are these two jokers. How come you spared the kids, or is that the next masterpiece/sequel?

Posted by tennisplanet on April 27, 2008

Gary Coleman's Divorce Strokes(E! Online) ... 

LOS ANGELES – The honeymoon is over for Gary Coleman and his new bride.

The 40-year-old actor and his 22-year-old wife, Shannon Price, are set to appear on TV’s “Divorce Court” on May 1 and 2. The couple wed in August after meeting on the set of the 2006 comedy “Church Ball.”

Among the problems the pair discusses with Judge Lynn Toler are Coleman’s anger and intimacy issues. Coleman and Price agree they have “ugly” monthly fights.

“If he doesn’t get his way, he throws a temper tantrum like a five-year-old does,” Price says, according to a transcript of the show provided to The Associated Press. “He like stomps the floor and yells, ‘Meehhhh,’ and starts throwing stuff around. He bashes his head in the wall, too.”

Coleman says he gets frustrated because “the male is always the bad guy.”

“When I try to state my case or explain things to her or try to get her to understand my point of view,” Coleman says, “my point of view doesn’t matter.”

Price also complains that Coleman has no friends and inexplicably disappears from home in the middle of the night. When Toler presses him, Coleman admits he is negative.

“I don’t have any friends and don’t have any intention of making any,” he says. “People will stab you in the back, mistreat you, talk about me behind your back, steal from you. And they’re not really your friends. (They’re) only there because you’re a celebrity or because they want to get something from you.”

Coleman went on to describe the couple’s private life as “mediocre.”

“It’s not her fault,” he says. “I always feel like I have the weight of the world on my shoulders every day I get up. … There are days I don’t even want to get up.”

“Divorce Court” is a syndicated show on which couples appear to settle real divorce cases. The show’s judge resolves issues such as alimony and asset division, and her decisions are legally binding.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

Nadal still holds that mental edge against Federer. Can there be any other explanation?

Posted by tennisplanet on April 27, 2008

Switzerland's Roger Federer reacts after losing against Spain's Rafael Nadal  during their final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  

Federer is up a break in the first set and 4-0 up in the second. That scoreline is virtually unheard of against Nadal on clay. And what happens? Federer disintegrates to hand Nadal just his second straight set victory over Federer on clay in eight attempts. Nadal leads 7-1.

You think that’s strange? Are you freaking kidding me!!!!!!!!!! Just run down the seven matches both these jokers have played on clay before this one. From 17 break point opportunities to fifth set tie-breaker to fourth set tie-breakers, Federer had a very real shot of winning the match at all but one of their meetings on clay.

Swiss player Roger Federer serves the ball to Novak Djokovic of Serbia during their semi-final of the Monte Carlo Tennis Open tournament in Monaco, Saturday, April 26, 2008.  

That consistent meltdown at critical juncture has nothing to do with the physical game (although today’s match may have had little bit of that too). Any coach of any freaking sport can testify to that. Reason why players like Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant are feared for their clutch play is because of their mental make up. That’s the only difference and the reason, why others fail at that all important moment. Even LeBron James has struggled at that perch.

44 unforced errors in this match, most of them from his reliable go-to shot forehand further drives the point home. Nadal deserves some credit for that too, by attacking Federer’s backhand so relentlessly and predictably that Federer had to take that extra step and second(s) to run around to hit his feared forehand to set up the next point. When that maneuver becomes an actual strategy for the match, you know the unforced errors have no place to go but up.

Roger Federer of Switzerland displays his trophy after his final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco against Rafael Nadal, Sunday, April 27, 2008. Nadal won 7-5, 7-5.  

What may have happened additionally this time to account for the unexpected scoreboard, was the inconsistent play Federer has had since he has stepped on clay this season. Other than the Nalbandian and Djokovic match, Federer cannot truly be happy with the way he progressed through two clay court events. In fact, the first set against Djokovic may have been his best performance of the entire season this year. Other than that, brilliant flashes throughout this stretch of ten matches have not been consistent. And when your best shot gives up on you, the bust in confidence just gets compounded.

It’s not that Federer has lost his magic entirely, it’s just that the regularity with which it automatically surfaced at practically every match he played for the past four some years, has dropped progressively since his first loss to Canas. This season, that frequency has only gotten worse. Just one title at an event full of tomato cans four months into the season and after six tournaments is proof enough. Federer has already lost five matches this year AND all to five different players: Djokovic, Murray, Fish, Roddick and Nadal.

That’s about the number of matches he lost the entire year for the last four freaking years, and we are still in April.

Nevertheless, Federer still has many positives to pick from here and Estoril. After all, it could have been much worse. Besides, he did knock out quality talent in Nalbandian and Djokovic back to back and reached the finals at two straight tournaments. Both being clay events further consolidates the gain.

With three more clay events to go, this ten match stretch on clay can only help specially with Jose in the corner this year. But the march will not be easy. Of the ten matches he has so far, if you take away the two retirements, Federer has lost a set at all but just three of them. That includes Rochus, Gremelmayr, Ramirez, Nalbandian and Nadal.

Federer is still work in progress and this start on clay should be taken as optimistically overall. However, there’s lot of work ahead to get any semblance of the dominating self he once was.

Posted in Uncategorized | 14 Comments »

Nadal-Federer final in photos.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 27, 2008

Rafael Nadal (right) of Spain poses with Prince Albert II of Monaco after his 7-5,7-5 victory in the singles final match against Roger Federer of Switzerland on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club on April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images)

Roger Federer of Switzerland (left) talks with Prince Albert II of Monaco after his 5-7,5-7 defeat in the singles final match against Rafael Nadal of Spain on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club on April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) 

Rafael Nadal (right) of Spain is presented with the winners trophy by Prince Albert II of Monaco after his 7-5,7-5 victory in the singles final match against Roger Federer of Switzerland on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club, April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) 

Spain's Rafael Nadal returns to  Switzerland's Roger Federer  in their final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008. Nadal won 7-5, 7-5.  

Switzerland's Roger Federer reacts after losing against Spain's Rafael Nadal  during their final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  
Spain's Rafael Nadal serves to  Switzerland's Roger Federer  in their final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  
Spain's Rafael Nadal, right,  shake hands with Switzerland's Roger Federer after their final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008. Nadal won 7-5, 7-5. 

Roger Federer of Switzerland returns a shot during his 5-7,5-7 defeat in the singles final match against Rafael Nadal of Spain on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club, April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images)

Roger Federer of Switzerland hits backhand during his 5-7,5-7 defeat in the singles final match against Rafael Nadal of Spain on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club, April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) 

Roger Federer of Switzerland competes during his 5-7,5-7 defeat in the singles final match against Rafael Nadal of Spain on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club, April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) 

Spain's Rafael Nadal reacts as he holds his trophy after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer  in their final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  
Rafael Nadal of Spain holds his trophy after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer in their final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008. Nadaal won 7-5, 7-5.

Spain's Rafael Nadal smiles after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer  in their final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008. Nadal won 7-5, 7-5.  

Rafael Nadal of Spain, left, with his victory cup, reacts with Roger Federer of Switzerland, during the final of the Monte Carlo Tennis Open tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  
Rafael Nadal of Spain holds his trophy aloft after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer in their final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.Nadal won 7-5, 7-5.  

Rafael Nadal of Spain poses with his trophies, after defeating Roger Federer of Switzerland during the final of the Monte Carlo Tennis Open tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  

Rafael Nadal of Spain holds his trophy after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer in their final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008. Nadal won 7-5, 7-5.  
Rafael Nadal of Spain, second left, Roger Federer of Switzerland, right, Elisabeth Anne De Massi President of the Country Club, second right,  stand with Monaco's Prince Albert II after Nadal won the final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008. Nadal won 7-5, 7-5.  
Rafael Nadal won an historic fourth successive Monte Carlo Masters title as he defeated world number one Roger Federer 7-5, 7-5 in the latest thrilling instalment of their epic rivalry. 
Roger Federer of Switzerland displays his trophy after his final match of the Monte Carlo Open Tennis tournament in Monaco against Rafael Nadal, Sunday, April 27, 2008. Nadal won 7-5, 7-5.  

Rafael Nadal of Spain returns the ball to Swiss player Roger Federer, during their final of the Monte Carlo Tennis Open tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  
Swiss player Roger Federer returns the ball to Rafael Nadal of Spain during their final of the Monte Carlo Tennis Open tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  
Rafael Nadal of Spain reacts after beating Roger Federer of Switzerland, during the final of the Monte Carlo Tennis Open tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  
Rafael Nadal of Spain walks off court central after his 7-5,7-5 victory in the singles final match against Roger Federer of Switzerland on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club, April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images)

Rafael Nadal of Spain reacts after defeating Roger Federer of Switzerland, during the final of the Monte Carlo Tennis Open tournament in Monaco, Sunday, April 27, 2008.  

Rafael Nadal of Spain celebrates match point during his 7-5,7-5 victory in the singles final match against Roger Federer of Switzerland on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club, April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) 

Rafael Nadal of Spain celebrates match point during his 7-5,7-5 victory in the singles final match against Roger Federer of Switzerland on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club, April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco. (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images)

Caroline Scheuffele (L) Eva Herzigova and Fawaz Gruosi (R) attend the singles final match between Rafael Nadal of Spain and Roger Federer of Switzerland on day nine of the Monte Carlo Masters Series tennis tournament on April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.   (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images) 

Charlene Wittstock (centre L) and Prince Albert II of Monaco (centre R) applaud during the singles final match between Rafael Nadal of Spain and Roger Federer of Switzerland on day nine of the Monte Carlo Masters Series tennis tournament on April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.   (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images) 

Charlene Wittstock (L) and Prince Albert II of Monaco applaud during the singles final match between Rafael Nadal of Spain and Roger Federer of Switzerland on day nine of the Monte Carlo Masters Series tennis tournament on April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.   (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images) 

Rafael Nadal of Spain (right) and Tommy Robredo (left) of Spain lift the winners trophies after victory in the doubles final match against Mahesh Bhupathi of India and Mark Knowles of Bahamas on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club, April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) 

Roger Federer of Switzerland hits backhand during his 5-7,5-7 defeat in the singles final match against Rafael Nadal of Spain on day nine of the Masters Series at the Monte Carlo Country Club, April 27, 2008 in Monte Carlo, Monaco.  (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) 

Posted in Uncategorized | 5 Comments »

Henman vs. Federer. From truthfinder. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 27, 2008

truthfinder

Henman vs. Federer

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

Federer’s interview after losing to Nadal at Monte Carlo. From cms. Thanks.

Posted by tennisplanet on April 27, 2008

cms

Fed’s interview today:

Q. How do you view that match, looking back on it?

ROGER FEDERER: Uhm, I thought it was, you know, a tough match obviously.

But, no, I thought I played okay. You know, disappointing second set, I guess, you know, after playing, you know, the right way against him and then, you know, letting him back into the match. You know, it was disappointing. Maybe I didn’t play my best for sure.

But it’s tough against him, you know, under the circumstances, you know. And he deserves to win in the end, you know, I think because he’s a helluva clay court player.

Q. So what do you take away? Obviously you’re not happy but maybe you’re not so disappointed either.

ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, it takes a lot to be disappointed for me, you know. I mean, honestly I’m coming back strong. I’m happy the way things, where they are now, whereas still maybe a few weeks ago, still a little bit of doubt maybe, you know.

But honestly for me it’s a very positive week of coming back from the brink, you know, in the first round, and now playing ‑‑ you know, beating great players, you know, on the way to the finals.

I’m pushing Rafa today, having the feeling I can beat him, you know, if I play the right way. And I think that’s the feeling I didn’t have after, you know, Monaco last year.

So this year changed, you know. And that’s a good thing. Just, you know, playing again, being healthy, moving well. It’s just a good feeling to have again.

SCANAGATTA: Q. The other day you said it was our job to look for when you were able to recover from 1‑5 in the third set. Do you remember by chance if it has ever happened that you lost a set when you were leading 4‑Love?

ROGER FEDERER: Also your job again. So, no.

SCANAGATTA Q. No idea?

ROGER FEDERER: No idea.

Q. Are you going to be taking Jose to Rome?

ROGER FEDERER: No. He’s going to go back home. I told you already. He’s going to go back home and then come back for Paris.

Q. Could you possibly say what you think he’s actually brought to your game so far, Jose?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, the thing is we haven’t spent much time on the practice courts, you know, which is normally a thing you’re not supposed to do. But there’s no rules obviously to it. But just this is where he you could maybe change a few things in your game. This has been more of a talking experience for the last couple of weeks, you know, because I’ve been on the match courts, you know, every day. So it’s been interesting, you know. A lot of information.

It was also good to play against Rafa I think on clay right away again and get a feel for how he’s playing. So it’s been good with him, as well, you know. And also with Severin, like I said, he’s also part of the whole thing. He’s going to come to Rome and Hamburg with me. Jose’s going to go back, and then we’ll get together again in Paris.

MARTUCCI: The biggest improvement do you think Nadal did is on the backhand or in other things?

ROGER FEDERER: No, just in general, you know, he’s a more complete player. But that was an obvious thing for me, he was going to be able to achieve that. You know, it just shows. He’s in the doubles finals as well. You wouldn’t have thought that maybe four years ago. So it was obvious he was going to improve at the net, improve his serve, improve his whatever it is.

He’s still young and improving. That’s why it’s important just for him to play compact and tough. You know, he brings that day in and day out on clay. For him it’s just so natural and so no‑problem that it makes it hard for the other players to beat him.

SCANAGATTA Q. Today you made less points on your serve than you won. That has never happened as far as I know. How do you explain it? Do you think it has something to do with your serve or his return?

ROGER FEDERER: I think he played well from the baseline, you know. He had great length, you know, especially on the forehand side. I know I had a bad record on second‑serve points won, you know. Might be the leader, you know, on tour. Today I barely made 30%, so it just shows what a tough clay court return player he is.

But, no, I don’t know what the problem was. I didn’t think I served particularly bad. But, like I said, my attacking game didn’t really work. And maybe this is where I lost a few ‑‑ you know, probably I guess too many points.

Q. You seemed to be a little more relaxed and perhaps not even as disappointed with yourself as you have been in other circumstances when you lost to Rafa. Is that right?

ROGER FEDERER: No. I don’t remember being relaxed here last year.

Q. Maybe perhaps not quite as depressed. Is that because you think your game is getting better and you are improving?

ROGER FEDERER: I don’t know. I guess I’m growing up, you know, don’t take losses that bad any more.

But I don’t expect losses against Rafa at all. You know, I mean, I try everything I can. And when it’s not enough, it’s unfortunate, you know. But like I said, I think it was a good match for me, you know, to play him here.

I probably said it on many occasions, but today I felt much more confident, you know. The way the plays were played were more the way I liked it than still maybe last year where I felt like I was completely out of the match from the start, you know. So today was better. And maybe that’s why I’m not that disappointed.

But just because I’m relaxed here doesn’t mean, you know, I’m sort of not disappointed, whatever. I wish I could have won today.

SCANAGATTA Q. Were you also tired at the end or you could have played five sets?

ROGER FEDERER: Could have played seven sets if I had to, no problem. It’s a pity, best‑of‑three‑set finals. They’re over so quickly, you know.

Like I said yesterday, I don’t think fitness mattered at all today ’cause, you know, what, six, seven hours on court throughout the week. Normally we do 20. So this is peanuts.

http://www.blogquotidiani.net/tennis/?page_id=1939#fed27

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments »