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Scariest part about Nadal.

Posted by tennisplanet on September 25, 2010

Is it his never-die attitude, his retrieving ability, top spin, coaching team, physical endurance, picking habit, coaching tips, ability to look at two targets (lazy eye), right hand left hand combination………………? Have a clue? No, you don’t!!!!!!!!!!!

Here’s a hint. That same quality has been conspicuously missing in Federer – at least so far.

Could it be his ability to constantly improve – specially vis-a-vis his main competition on tour? Heard of Blake, Tsonga, Federer? Heard of serve – on hard courts? Don’t think anybody else on the tour – past or present – is an embodiment of that trait as fantastically as Nadal.

All that makes ANY future threat(s) a tad easier to stomach if you are Nadal or his team. Delpo has weapons but there are MANY antidotes available on the open market. And that strip tease and shrinking lips can only take you so far.

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9 Responses to “Scariest part about Nadal.”

  1. mircea said

    Scariest part is that his knees could blow up any day. If you are getting plasma injections, it’s a temporary solution. Even sadder, what will he be like when he’s 40 or 50. I hope he’s not going all out because he knows it’s now or never.

    • wuiches said

      “Scariest part is that his knees could blow up any day.”

      Roger’s dream!!!

    • claire said

      “Even sadder, what will he be like when he’s 40 or 50.”

      If I were Nadal, that’s what I would worry about! I think he is going like a bull to get as many GS’s,etc. before the knees say no more! Nadal loves to fish so I guess when he has to retire he can do a lot of that!

      “Roger’s dream”

      I don’t know about that.

      I do remember that Federer said he knew if Nadal didn’t play a FO, he would win. Maybe Federer is thinking that about Nadal’s knee’s- Federer’s thinking Nadal can’t possible have another year like 2010! The knee’s have let Nadal down in the past and I think they will continue to in the future!

      Can Nadal keeping doing those treatments indefinitely? Isn’t the therapy something to the effect of shooting you own blood (plus something else?) into knee to promote joints to hear quicker? Will Nadal eventually need to keep increasing the treatments because the knee will require more injections to heal? Kinda like the knee will become immune to the level of therapy now?

      • Arjun said

        Can’t help but think that the scaremongering here gets a little ridiculous sometimes.

        “Even sadder, what will he be like when he’s 40 or 50”
        He seems to be fine at the moment. I think he’ll be fine at 40/50, apart from the niggles of old/middle age. I’d also expect medical science to have advanced significantly over the next 15-25 years.

        “Can Nadal keeping doing those treatments indefinitely? ”

        If I understand his doctor’s interview correctly, he’s done this treatment once, over his 5 year+ career. He probably won’t need to do it again, let alone ‘indefinitely’.
        It would need his knees to reach a stage where they can’t regenerate easily themselves, and I’d expect he’ll be more careful in the future anyway.

        And theoretically speaking, why can’t he do this treatment another 500 times if he needs it? Is there a time limit or expiry date or something?

        “Will Nadal eventually need to keep increasing the treatments because the knee will require more injections to heal? Kinda like the knee will become immune to the level of therapy now?”

        Any reason you think that the body will become immune to it’s own healing process? It’s a knee injury, not HIV.

      • Bonnie said

        “Will Nadal eventually need to keep increasing the treatments because the knee will require more injections to heal? Kinda like the knee will become immune to the level of therapy now?”

        “Any reason you think that the body will become immune to it’s own healing process? It’s a knee injury, not HIV.”

        I do agree with you Arjun, regarding the above statement; however, autoimmune diseases, diseases where the body’s immune system is compromised in one way or another, and where the body can actually attack itself (in the form of arthritis) can actually be brought on by overuse and abuse of your joints. Also, a body CAN grow immune to treatment after a while, no matter what it is. I do not wish any of this on Rafa, but I do know, from experience, that an autoimmune disease is worth protecting your body from, at all costs, because once you have it, you don’t get rid of it.

  2. M said

    I agree with you, TP, that the “scariest” part about Rafa — to his opponents, at least — is his ability and willingness to constantly improve.

    I’m not sure, though, it’s so much something “missing” in Roger, as it is something that needs to be, maybe, persistently goosed.

    I remember reading interviews with Peter Lundgren, where he talked about Roger being “tough to motivate” in the beginning of their work together, in part because he was so gifted.

    I think as the work and constant improvement of Roger’s rival Rafa has caught up, in a sense, to that natural giftedness, that we’ve seen a gradual, but commensurate increase in Roger’s continued willingness to improve as well, culminating most recently in his ongoing work with PA (I’m really happy Roger seems to appear patient with the time it may take for all the results that he wants to come — even taking into account the team has already won a championship working together thus far).

    After all — isn’t there some quote somewhere about “10% inspiration, 90% perspiration” …? 🙂

  3. Growltiger said

    “I agree with you, TP, that the “scariest” part about Rafa — to his opponents, at least — is his ability and willingness to constantly improve.”

    And that he CAN improve.

  4. Jenny said

    I agree TP. Years ago folk were calling Federer scary, but then there will always be one or two players that stand out from the pack, winning most everything in sight, eg Rafa and Roger. Whilst I take absolutely nothing away from Rafa, but let’s be fair, I think the majority of players have strived to improve on all surfaces over the years and have successfully done so, either toughening up mentally or improving their technique and adding to their arsenal, basically most of these guys can play on any surface these days. Before my time, the Spaniard, Manolo Santana was somewhat a pioneer in the 60’s, he chose to travel out of his comfort zone by bringing his clay court technique and adapting it to other surfaces, and that was before the slowing down of other surfaces! He also possessed a single handed back hand. Santana won Wimbledon [1], US Open [1] and the French [2]. Juan Carlos Ferrero followed and to a lesser extent Carlos Moya.

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